News

BBC 4 radio 4 appeal for Calvert Trust

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On Sunday 18th September 2016 at 7.55am, BBC Radio 4 will broadcast an appeal on behalf of the three Calvert Trust Centres in Exmoor, Northumberland and The Lake District. The appeal is being made by Frank Gardner, and features the story of Calvert Trust guest Scott, and his mum Claire.

As well as being BBC Security Correspondent and a bestselling author, Frank Gardner is also a former guest at Calvert Trust Exmoor, having stayed at the centre in 2007 as part of his recovery programme.  Frank became a wheelchair user in 2004, after being shot 6 times at close range whilst reporting in Saudi Arabia.

Royal Highland Centre to host Kidz to Adultz Scotland

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Edinburgh’s Highland Hall at the Royal Highland Centre is to host Kidz to Adultz Scotland – one of the largest, free Scottish events dedicated to children and young adults up to 25 years with disabilities and additional needs, their families and the professionals who work with them in Scotland.

Approximately 120,000 children and adults in Scotland are living with a learning disability[1], and over one million are living with a sensory impairment.[2]

Over 80 exhibitors will assemble at Highland Hall on Thursday 15th September to offer advice, support and information on mobility, communication, equipment and technology, education, toys and learning aids, transport, beds and seating, service, funding, sports and leisure and much more. 

Together Trust shortlisted for children and young people award

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North West charity, the Together Trust, has been shortlisted for a Children & Young People Now Award in The Family Support category.

The awards which have become a gold standard for everyone working with children, young people and families, showcase best practice from across the country.

Together Trust help over 2,325 people in the North West each year with specialist education, fostering, residential and community support.

This nomination recognises the work of the Together Trust’s ASC Sleep Clinic, which supports families with children and young people with autism to develop healthy sleep routines through tailored sleep programmes and specialist support and advice.

Notts County Football Club sign the Autism Alliance Charter

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Notts County Football Club have opened three sensory rooms at Meadow Lane, becoming the first EFLclub to provide specialist facilities for those who experience anxiety in stadium environments. In a ceremony which also saw the club sign the Autism Alliance charter, the rooms were officially opened ahead of Saturday’s Sky Bet League Two match against Grimsby Town by Notts head grounds man Trevor Hutchinson and his daughter Tyler, who has complex learning difficulties including Autism.

Disabled children almost twice as likely to be target of crime

Disabled children are almost twice as likely to be victims of crime as non-disabled children, according to a new report from the Equality and Human Rights Commission.  The Commission’s research found that 22% of disabled young people in England and Wales aged 10-15 had been the victim of crime in the previous 12 months, compared to 12% of non-disabled young people of the same age. 

Equality and Human Rights Commission Chair David Isaac has called the findings “a wake-up call”, which brings into question our assumptions on the legacy of the London Paralympic Games.   

Stockport community service celebrates 30th birthday

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A Stockport-based community service has celebrated its 30th anniversary at a birthday party with friends, past and present.

Newbridge, which is run by North West charity the Together Trust, is a community day service for people with learning difficulties offering a diverse range of exciting and varied activities for people aged 18 to 30.

The sun shone on the birthday celebrations which saw staff and people who have accessed the service come together to mark the special occasion with a party filled with singing, dancing and reminiscing over the past three decades.

Deafblind people from around Europe to participate in Exmoor activity week

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·      Over 60 people to take part in a week of outdoor activity at the Calvert Trust outdoor adventure centre in Exmoor, Devon
·      Initiative developed in partnership with Sense, the National deafblind charity, and the Deafblind International Outdoor Network

 

Deafblind people from the UK and around Europe will be gathering to enjoy a week of sporting activity in Devon from the 12th to the 16th of September.
 
The initiative by the Deafblind International Outdoor Network and Sense, the national deafblind charity, will bring together over 60 deafblind people and support staff, from the UK and around Europe, to participate in a week of outdoor activity at the award-winning Calvert Trust adventure centre in Exmoor.  
 

Colours in the Classroom: What Works Best for Children with Special Educational Needs?

Well-designed classrooms use colour. Colour creates interest, provides contrast and stimulates a child’s senses. It also highlights key teaching points, classifies information, and provides an engaging environment for children to learn in.  

However, using colour in the classroom isn’t a simple case of putting some paint on the walls. And nor is it just about making eye-catching displays! Instead, the colours we use and the way we use them have a huge impact on children with special education needs

Helping SEN students to gain valuable work experience

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Young people all over the country will have completed some work experience this summer and for many it will be their first contact with an employer and an invaluable opportunity to discover more about what a particular career is really like, to learn new skills, build contacts and see how it feels to work 9-5.

I’m a huge believer in the benefits work placements provide, not least in demonstrating the ‘soft’ skills necessary to make someone ‘employable’ - such as communication and team-working.  

BFI funds accessible workshops for deafblind filmmakers

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Sense, the national deafblind charity, has been awarded £31,000 by the BFI (British Film Institute), to enable deafblind people to take part in a series of accessible filmmaking workshops.

The Accessible Filmmaking Project, delivered in collaboration with Kate Dangerfield from the University of Roehampton, will see ten weekly workshops take place across the country, each focusing on exploration and experimentation of film as a form of communication and expression. The project will provide creative opportunities for people with sensory impairments to experiment with filmmaking techniques, test equipment for accessibility and improve access to low-budget film production and audio-visual media.

BFI funds accessible workshops for deafblind filmmakers

accessible-workshops

Sense, the national deafblind charity, has been awarded £31,000 by the BFI (British Film Institute), to enable deafblind people to take part in a series of accessible filmmaking workshops.

The Accessible Filmmaking Project, delivered in collaboration with Kate Dangerfield from the University of Roehampton, will see ten weekly workshops take place across the country, each focusing on exploration and experimentation of film as a form of communication and expression. The project will provide creative opportunities for people with sensory impairments to experiment with filmmaking techniques, test equipment for accessibility and improve access to low-budget film production and audio-visual media.

Active IQ Unveils Tech Level Diploma in Physical Activity, Fitness & Exercise Science

A truly vocational course with strong career prospects for school leavers

As school leavers receive their GCSE Results (Thursday August 25, 2016) they must decide on their next steps in education or training.  Some will opt for A Levels while others may look for a job, training programme or apprenticeship to set them on a career path.  

‘Autism’s got Talent Roadshow’ heads to Stockton-on-Tees

‘Autism’s got Talent Roadshow’ heads to Stockton-on-Tees

This year’s ‘Autism’s got Talent Roadshow’ takes place on 16 September at ARC, Stockton Arts Centre, in Stockton-on-Tees.

Showcasing the diverse talents of individuals on the autistic spectrum, the roadshow is a spin-off from Autism’s Got Talent – launched by the autism charity Anna Kennedy Online and created by Anna Kennedy OBE.

AnnaKennedyonline and Daisy Chain Charities are working together again to stage the event, after a successful roadshow last year at Teesside University. Anna Kennedy is patron of Daisy Chain and several key autism charities and support groups.

She said ‘Autism’s Got Talent’ is a special event that is “one of a kind, and is extremely poignant to those with autism and their families. 

Sense welcomes Corbyn’s policy on free universal childcare

Sense welcomes Corbyn’s policy on free universal childcare

However, the deafblind charity has warned the policy is unachievable without sufficient funding for disabled children’s childcare

National deafblind charity Sense today (04 August) responded to Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership manifesto in which he announced plans that a Corbyn-led Labour government would introduce free universal childcare.

Head of Public Policy, Kate Fitch said:

Blockbuster films and The Big Friendly Read – how books are making this summer autism friendly

Blockbuster films and The Big Friendly Read – how books are making this summer autism friendly

As some of our favourite literary characters hit the big screen, one charity is asking their autism friendly cinema guests to visit their local library and spread the autism friendly message.

Building on the success of their monthly autism friendly cinema screenings, learning disability and autism support provider, Dimensions, launched autism friendly libraries in partnership with the Association of Senior Children’s and Education Librarians. 

By providing training and resources, they hope to see libraries across the country making a few simple adjustments to create an inclusive and welcoming environment for their guests on the autistic spectrum.

Henry’s triple success with school awards after vision boost

Henry’s triple success with school awards after vision boost

Sussex schoolboy Henry Johnston has ended the school year on a high after he was awarded not one but THREE achievement awards.

Henry, 13, attends Tanbridge House School in Horsham and also spends part of his school week at the Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee School which caters for children with severe or profound and multiple learning difficulties, or complex needs.

Henry received a Headteacher's award for the year and an award in recognition of effort and achievement at Tanbridge House School. 

He also received an award for overall enjoyment and achievement from Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee School.

Award-winning educational software provides a solution to the note-taking conundrum

Award-winning educational software provides a solution to the note-taking conundrum

Taking notes in lectures is difficult. Trying to understand complex, unfamiliar information while simultaneously capturing all the important points in writing is a challenge for any student.

But for students with disabilities that affect writing, organisation and working memory, taking effective written notes is beyond difficult – it’s a major barrier to learning.

In a recent study, when asked what problems they encounter at university, 95% of students with dyslexia said note taking - more than any other academic requirement (Webster D.M., 2016).

In an education system where most instruction is imparted orally, ineffective note taking is a major handicap. The research is unequivocal: students who take better notes get better grades (Titsworth, 2004).

‘Pokémon Go could ease Type 2 diabetes burden’

‘Pokémon Go could ease Type 2 diabetes burden’

University of Leicester researcher suggests smartphone craze could help challenge rising obesity levels Leading diabetes researchers believe smartphone craze Pokémon Go could be an “innovative solution” to rising obesity levels and chronic disease.  

Millions of people around the world have started to play Pokémon Go, a virtual reality treasure hunt where players must walk to places within the real world and catch, train and battle monsters which appear on their mobile phone screens. Dr Tom Yates, a Reader in Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Health at the University of Leicester based at the Leicester Diabetes Centre, said:

BBC launches search for next BBC Young Dancer

The BBC has launched its search for the next generation of dance talent, as it opens applications for BBC Young Dancer 2017.

Following the success of the first competition last year, the BBC is inviting applicants to submit entries in four categories: Ballet, Contemporary, South Asian Dance and Street Dance.

The competition provides an opportunity for UK dancers aged 16-21 to demonstrate their abilities through four competitive rounds.

BBC Young Dancer is a fully inclusive project, and applications from deaf and disabled dancers aged 16-25 are welcome.

The entry brochure is available in easy read, Braille and as an audio version.