Features

Tokens Help Enforce School Rewards Systems For Children With Additional Needs

behavioural support network Tockens for logo

TokensFor a leading plastic token manufacturer for schools, provides a behavioural support network and reward system, for children in schools who are on the autistic spectrum.

House point systems have long been employed in schools, proving to be an effective way of encouraging and motivating pupils. Intangible rewards, in the form of verbal or written praise, are commonly used, with most children understanding that a point from the teacher is equivalent to a merit.

LGfL and Adobe join forces to boost creativity in schools across the UK and London

LGfL and Adobe helping children with creativity at schools

Edtech charity London Grid for Learning and Adobe to equip thousands of schools across the UK – including over 500 secondary and 1600 primary schools in all 33 London boroughs - with free digital and creative software to help children develop skills for their future careers

EdTech charity LGfL (London Grid for Learning) and creative software company Adobe have joined forces to provide access to software that will help to equip the next generation of school children with skills to thrive in the future workplace.  

Autism Awareness Raised by wearing Silly Socks

Avant homes wearing Silly socks for Autism East Midlands

On Friday 5th April organisations around the East Midlands donned their silly socks in order to raise awareness of autism and fundraise for regional autism charity Autism East Midlands. Over 50 businesses from across the East Midlands took part. These included Rolls Royce, The Nottingham Panthers and Avant Homes. In addition 39 School, colleges and universities joined in with the fun.

The autism spectrum is wide-ranging, no two autistic individuals are alike as autism affects everybody differently. It can occur alongside other conditions such as anxiety, depression and learning disability.

Introducing Visual Stress Help by Claremon…

Introducing Visual Stress Help by Claremon…

We specialise in working with schools by providing tinted exercise books for children who struggle with writing and reading. We now also have a new line of 80-page, tinted books offering the best quality and value for our customers.

Approximately 20% of the population suffer from varying degrees of visual distortion.Colour has been proven to help in the perception of text. Our books help students who suffer visual stress alone or alongside dyslexia and other conditions.They allow your students to write on and read their own work on a tinted background with improved concentration and confidence by reducing the glare of the bright white paper. 

Does the UK Have an Adequate Support in Place for Children with Special Educational Needs?

Child with special educational needs being supported by a teacher

It’s essential that young people receive a strong foundation in education to prepare them for their future. Our self-progression and self-development are dependent upon our ability to absorb and process knowledge on range of different topics, experiences and events. Through our learning experience at school, we gain a better understanding of the world and our place within it.

Making learning accessible for everyone is hugely important, including for those with special educational needs (SEN). It’s fair to say that this segment of our population faces a greater set of challenges with learning and teaching methods often require a specialist approach. 

The Children’s Trust School

The Children’s Trust School

The Children’s Trust School is a non-maintained special school dedicated to the education, health, therapy and care of children and young people aged 2-19.

Located in Tadworth, Surrey, just south of London and within the M25 (J8), we are able to support children and young people with a wide range of special needs including neurodisability and complex education, health, therapy and care requirements through day and residential placements.

Over Half of Young People Value Group Identity as Highly as Individual Identity 

Group of children

A recent survey conducted by custom screen printing & embroidery company Yazzoo Personalised Clothing discovered that over half of young people value group identity as highly as individual identity.

It has been argued that group identity has always played a role in determining the value placed on individual choices. Historically, identity was prefabricated depending on the group a person belonged to. These groups, guilds and castes created cohesive identities that carried with them sets of values and conditions for living. Today, identity is more fluid. Identity is no longer assigned at birth — it is constantly shifting as people move between careers, locations and personal choices.

Disadvantaged Children To Benefit From Free Early Language And Literacy Apps

Children Using Free Early Language And Literacy Apps

Disadvantaged families to receive free access to some of the best early learning apps for phones and tablets

Thousands of families in the north of England to take part in projects aimed at boosting young children’s language and literacy development at home 

Education Secretary sets out the next steps in his vision for improving home learning, so that every child gets the best start in life

How can learners with disabilities benefit from recent AI advances?

Children with disabilities at school

Diagnosing a learning disability can prove to be a challenging job: every learning disability is different and so is every learner. In the UK, over 1 million people live with a learning disability. Of this growing number, 2 out of 5 are not appropriately diagnosed in childhood.

The traditional teaching model relies on a classroom of students being uniformly delivered the same message. The presence of a student with a learning disability poses a challenge to this model, as they may struggle with focus, the material, the speed, or several other aspects. As a result, these individuals often feel left behind.

How Animal Assisted Therapy in schools can improve children’s mental health

Little girl with white rabbit for animal assisted therapy

Animal Therapy in schools has made observable differences to children’s mental health, behaviour and wellbeing in the past. With more than 1/6th of young people identified as having Special Education Needs (SEN) and one in eight children assessed in 2017 being identified with at least one mental disorder, Animal Therapy could make a huge improvement to a child’s life.

Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) is delivered by a human professional, such as a teacher or therapist as a goal-directed intervention. Animal therapist Sarah Gordon believes that, in animal therapy, the comforting nature of animals is deployed so that a person is able to guide sessions towards objectives. AAT accreditation is also required to ensure the sessions are undertaken properly.

Outstanding! The Children’s Trust celebrates top Ofsted rating

Outstanding! The Children’s Trust celebrates top Ofsted rating

Staff, children and families at The Children’s Trust, which helps children and young people with brain injury and neurodisability, were celebrating this week after achieving an 'Outstanding' rating from Ofsted.

The charity, which supported 168 children at its centre last year, received ‘Outstanding’ in all three areas inspected by Ofsted under the social care framework on 12 December 2018. This news follows a recent Outstanding rating by the Care Quality Commission and ISO9001 accreditation that the charity also received last year.

Celebrities shine a light on the power of dyslexic thinking in new Awareness Training films for teachers and parents

Little girl writing in new Awareness Training films for teachers and parents

Hollywood stars Keira Knightly, OBE and Orlando Bloom are among the big names starring in a series of awareness training films designed to help teachers, educators and parents understand dyslexia and gain essential knowledge on how to recognise and support it, therefore creating a dyslexia inclusive classroom.

The five short movies, produced by global charity Made By Dyslexia, focus on the different way those with dyslexia think, the issues they face in a traditional classroom environment, and how dyslexic thinking and skills help companies meet the challenges of the 21st century workplace. 

Twinkl to launch AR game that attracts children to STEM subjects at Bett 2019

Twinkl AR game

The online educational publisher Twinkl has created the world’s first ever multiplayer AR game that teaches Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths.

ARchitect can be played by up to four people and invites players to create structures using different materials such as wood and ice, whilst facing challenges and adverse conditions.

The game introduces concepts such as structural integrity and provides a platform to learn real-world physics as players create towers, bridges and boats in a 3D world created with augmented reality. 

Twinkl will be exclusively showcasing ARchitect at the Bett education technology show, which runs from the 23rd to 26th January at the ExCeL in London

Best Practice Network

Best Practice Network Student & Teacher

Best Practice Network is an experienced and well-established provider of the National Award for SEN Co-ordination (NASENCO) with typically over 100 SENCOs or aspiring SENCOs starting the course with us each year. The qualification is mandatory for newly appointed SENCOs, but can also be excellent CPD for more experienced practitioners who want to refresh their knowledge and skills. Offered in partnership with Bath Spa University, the Award incorporates the Postgraduate Certificate in SEN Coordination from their Professional Master’s Programme, worth the first 60 credits towards a Master’s (MA) degree.

Gratnells award-winning MakerSpace trolley shortlisted for prestigious Education award

Gratnells award-winning MakerSpace trolley

The latest addition to the Callero family of storage solutions, Gratnells MakerSpace trolley is building on a successful launch with the news that it has been named a finalist for a prestigious industry award that highlights and rewards the quality and diversity of education products.

The MakerSpace trolley has been confirmed as a nominee for the GESS Education Awards 2019, in the Innovation Product Awards – Equipment/Hardware/non-ICT category. The award ceremony takes place in February at the leading education show in the Middle East, GESS Dubai, and aims to encourage the raising of educational services and product standards throughout the industry.

Tech Entrepreneur Launches App To Support Children With Dyslexia

Tech Entrepreneur Launches App To Support Children With Dyslexia

Kilkenny tech entrepreneur, Brendan Morrissey has launched a specialist smartphone application dedicated to providing support for those living and working with Dyslexia and ADHD. 

iDyslexic has been rolled out to users across Ireland, with firm plans in place to assist children suffering with Dyslexia and ADHD across the globe.  

Following 18 months in development, iDyslexic is an easy-to-use digital platform that allows the Child, Parent, Teacher and Case Worker to log into a secure classroom to aid continuous support and development. 

Servelec wins tender to provide Hackney Learning Trust with Synergy Education Management Information System

Servelec wins tender to provide Hackney Learning Trust with Synergy Education Management Information System

Servelec, a provider of health, social care and education software, has won a competitive tender to supply Hackney Learning Trust, the Education Department of Hackney Council, with its Synergy Education Management Information System. Synergy will help the Trust to provide more targeted, digital education support to children, young people and their families. It replaces the Trust’s legacy Capita solution, which had been in place for 15 years.

Teenagers Need to Escape their Own Minds Warns Expert

Expert watching teenagers taking an exam

As young people gear up toward putting time into their revision for next year’s mock exams - and then A-levels and GCSE’s, NLP and mindfulness expert, Peter Wright, warns that parents should be ensuring young people adopt a healthy attitude towards revision, and be encouraged to escape from the pressures put on them by the system and by themselves.

According to the Mental Health Foundation, 10% of children and young people (aged 5-16 years) have a clinically diagnosable mental problem, yet 70% of children and adolescents who experience mental health problems have not had appropriate interventions at a sufficiently early age.