Adaptemy

How Adaptive Learning Technology Supports Languages

Supporting Interleaved Practice

A classroom is the worst environment in which to learn a language enter Adaptive Learning. With 30 or so students in a class, verbal exercises turn a room into a cacophony of excitement and confusion. With feedback only from peers, learning is slow and hard to measure.

Psycholinguistic findings suggest that learning ‘in the wild’ engages implicit memory systems which help to deeply embed a language. The more aural and visual opportunities there are to experience a language, the better a student’s learning and understanding. Practise and language immersion are essential.

Adopting Adaptive Learning: A teacher's Guide

Adaptive Learning

Part of the thriving edtech industry, Adaptive Learning fuses education with IT using computers as interactive learning devices. It presents educational content and resources to the user according to their unique needs.

It’s also veiled in mystery, jargon and scepticism. Hasty investments by Venture Capitalists into half-baked solutions have seen many a school stuck with a learning product rushed to market that ultimately does little to add value to the classroom.

A buzzword and a black hole

Enticingly, adaptive learning promises to feed the technical appetites of the digitally native youth; to deliver incrementally better learning experiences and outcomes; and to relieve busy teachers of the paper work and reporting that cloud their evenings and weekends.