Animal Assisted Therapy

How Animal Assisted Therapy in schools can improve children’s mental health

Little girl with white rabbit for animal assisted therapy

Animal Therapy in schools has made observable differences to children’s mental health, behaviour and wellbeing in the past. With more than 1/6th of young people identified as having Special Education Needs (SEN) and one in eight children assessed in 2017 being identified with at least one mental disorder, Animal Therapy could make a huge improvement to a child’s life.

Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) is delivered by a human professional, such as a teacher or therapist as a goal-directed intervention. Animal therapist Sarah Gordon believes that, in animal therapy, the comforting nature of animals is deployed so that a person is able to guide sessions towards objectives. AAT accreditation is also required to ensure the sessions are undertaken properly.