STEM subjects

The search for STEM in the real world

Children in a lab learning STEM subjects

Getting students interested in and excited about STEM subjects is imperative in today’s modern climate. The demand for a highly-skilled workforce is ever-increasing, but the reality is that too few graduates are entering into science, maths and engineering careers. In fact, research from 2018 showed that the skills shortage is costing the sector an estimated £1.5 billion a year. So, what can be done to bridge the gap? 

To truly inspire a young generation, we need to look beyond the textbooks and use real life examples to demonstrate their capabilities and prove that they can make a difference. After all, STEM is everywhere - you just have to look close enough. 

Twinkl to launch AR game that attracts children to STEM subjects at Bett 2019

Twinkl AR game

The online educational publisher Twinkl has created the world’s first ever multiplayer AR game that teaches Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths.

ARchitect can be played by up to four people and invites players to create structures using different materials such as wood and ice, whilst facing challenges and adverse conditions.

The game introduces concepts such as structural integrity and provides a platform to learn real-world physics as players create towers, bridges and boats in a 3D world created with augmented reality. 

Twinkl will be exclusively showcasing ARchitect at the Bett education technology show, which runs from the 23rd to 26th January at the ExCeL in London

Pupils win space challenge with NASA module design

Generation Beyond

Five UK primary school pupils are reaching for the stars after winning a competition to design a spacecraft for NASA, for the Generation Beyond Challenge.

The young scientists, from London and Surrey, are the winners of this year’s Generation Beyond Challenge - organised by Lockheed Martin and Discovery Education.

The challenge - a UK first - was launched to schools last year as part of a new STEM education programme to inspire the next generation of astronauts. Children were asked to stretch their imagination by designing a habitation module for Orion, the NASA spacecraft which will take the first crew to Mars in the 2030s.