teaching

What to keep in mind when teaching pupils with autism

Tania Marshall on teaching pupils with autism

Tania Marshall, M.Sc. – an award-winning author, psychologist, AspienGirl Project lead for girls with Autism or Asperger Syndrome, and Autism Ambassador for Education Placement Group which specialises in education recruitment – discusses best practice for teaching pupils on the autism spectrum, primarily focusing on high-functioning females…

Characteristics of autism in girls and boys and presentation in school 

Girls and boys with autism present quite differently to one another in school – and also across the lifespan. Generally speaking, both differ in terms of the severity of their symptoms, personality, IQ, social skills, sensory processing sensitivities, cognitive profile, disorders and learning disabilities. 

Teaching pupils emotional intelligence – behaviour management in schools

Lynn Hamblin of Supply Desk discusses behaviour

The behaviour of pupils in class has been proven to have a direct link to their educational outcomes. Here, Lyn Hamblin, former Leader of Student Personal Development and Wellbeing at St Albans Girls’ School and current Regional Director for Supply Desk Ltd, discusses the importance of helping children build their emotional intelligence skills as part of teachers’ approach to behaviour management…

Behaviour can affect learning 

Why schools use supply agencies

Supply Desk

Clare Othman, Operations Director, Supply Desk, specialists in matching school staffing needs with the best available teachers and teaching assistants - permanent, long-term and supply - gives her reasoning on why many schools choose supply agencies, such as Supply Desk, to fill teaching vacancies.

Education recruitment agencies, including supply agencies, have become an integral part of most UK school recruitment strategies.

Virtual Reality Learning

Virtual Reality

The role of virtual reality in classrooms is providing adjustments for students struggling with their mental health.

Mental health problems, such as anxiety, can inhibit someone’s ability to get to school and be physically present during lessons. Here, Sam Warnes, a former teacher and founder of EDLounge, a unique platform that gives students who struggle with mainstream education the opportunity to access learning, explains how virtual reality in classrooms can offer a solution for accommodating pupils with mental health issues.

Colours in the Classroom: What Works Best for Children with Special Educational Needs?

Well-designed classrooms use colour. Colour creates interest, provides contrast and stimulates a child’s senses. It also highlights key teaching points, classifies information, and provides an engaging environment for children to learn in.  

However, using colour in the classroom isn’t a simple case of putting some paint on the walls. And nor is it just about making eye-catching displays! Instead, the colours we use and the way we use them have a huge impact on children with special education needs