autism

The power of focus: new app Tiimo offers structure for pupils with autism

Melissa Würtz Azari, co-founder and CPO at Tiimo

Melissa Würtz Azari, co-founder and CPO at Tiimo, the assistive technology app that provides visual guidance and structure to those affected by ADHD, ADD and autism, comments on using technology to help pupils focus…

Cognitive deficit disorders can make daily life a little messy for the person affected and for those around them – and when we find ourselves in a tangled and confusing situation, the thing we need most is focus. While technology has traditionally been seen as a source of distraction – especially for children and young adults – we decided to use this fundamental aspect of our daily lives as a source of help, a useful tool to re-centre and find focus. 

Why marketers need greater neurodiversity

nerodiversity - a man points at a screen

by Mark Evans, Marketing Director, Direct Line Group

Despite contributing over £120bn to the UK economy, marketing is one of the most misunderstood industries amongst young people. As a result fewer people are considering becoming a marketer than ever before. According to research by Unidays, just 3% of students aged 18 to 24 believe marketing is a good career option, and only 2% believe it is the best career for long-term success. Marketing clearly needs to get better at marketing itself! 

Pupils with autism twice as likely to be bullied – what can teachers do? 

Tania Marshall, autism education expert

Primary pupils with special educational needs are twice as likely as other children to be bullied, according to the Institute of Education. Here, Tania Marshall, M.Sc., award-winning author, psychologist, AspienGirl Project lead for girls with Autism or Asperger Syndrome, and Autism Ambassador for Education Placement Group, specialists in education recruitment, discusses the key signs that indicate a female student with autism is being bullied as well as some strategies for preventing this harmful behaviour…

What to keep in mind when teaching pupils with autism

Tania Marshall on teaching pupils with autism

Tania Marshall, M.Sc. – an award-winning author, psychologist, AspienGirl Project lead for girls with Autism or Asperger Syndrome, and Autism Ambassador for Education Placement Group which specialises in education recruitment – discusses best practice for teaching pupils on the autism spectrum, primarily focusing on high-functioning females…

Characteristics of autism in girls and boys and presentation in school 

Girls and boys with autism present quite differently to one another in school – and also across the lifespan. Generally speaking, both differ in terms of the severity of their symptoms, personality, IQ, social skills, sensory processing sensitivities, cognitive profile, disorders and learning disabilities. 

Inclusive Festival raises autism awareness in the community  

A child plays with the dog mascot at Inclusive Festival

Options Roxby House celebrated a fantastic day in Scunthorpe as they hosted their annual Inclusive Festival: an opportunity to raise awareness for autism and bring together friends, families and the local community. 

The August festival was organised by Options Autism, part of Outcomes First Group – a national provider of care and education to children, young people and adults with autism, complex needs and learning difficulties. The main aim was to raise awareness of autism, fundraise and involve the local community. The festival was a resounding success - the sun shone for most of the day, resulting in a relaxed and open-air event and more than £1,500 was raised.  

Child mental health diagnosis: the need to be trauma informed

Dr Margot Sunderland, Director of Education and Training at The Centre for Child Mental Health

Dr Margot Sunderland, Director of Education and Training at The Centre for Child Mental Health, writes about trauma and loss and how teachers and other agencies must be well-informed to ensure correct diagnoses…

 

Of course many diagnoses given to children are accurate. Moreover, for some conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder, there is indisputable neurological evidence. That being said, what follows is a concern with misdiagnosis, which, in so many cases is utterly preventable if we are trauma informed.

'At Orbis we're passionate about creating great homes and an exceptional learning experience'

Orbis HR manager Simon Drinkwater

Simon Drinkwater recently joined Cardiff-based Orbis Education and Care as its new HR Director. Here, he talks to Education For Everybody about Orbis specialist schools and residential services for people with autism…

Tell us about Orbis and the service it provides.

Orbis Education and Care provides specialist day schools, as well as residential services for children and adults who have a formal diagnosis of autism. Orbis currently encompasses four residential schools for children and young people and nine adult homes.

How do you feel about joining Orbis and what are your plans in terms of HR?

FestABLE event to be held at SEND college

Sally Phillips FestABLE

Guest speakers including TVs Sally Phillips will gather for FestABLE on June 2 as part of the UK’s first national festival dedicated to specialist learning.

Youtubers, assistive technology experts and professionals working with young people who have special educational needs and disabilities will attend the event. 

Young people have helped plan FestABLE’s diverse programme which includes all sorts from the chance to go in the country’s only wheelchair-accessible hot air balloon and play with eye-gaze controlled computer games, to sessions on speech and occupational therapy, Education, Health and Care plans, early autism intervention, SEND reform and removing the barriers to achievement.

Book review: Sometimes I Feel Sad

Sometimes I Feel Sad - Kate

Sometimes I Feel Sad by Tom Alexander, Jessica Kingsley Publishers (£9.99)

Sometimes I Feel Sad is a moving, illustrated book which helps young children – especially those not in touch with their feelings – that sometimes it’s OK to feel sad.

Everyone feels sad from time to time, and it's not always clear why. This book explains that this is a part of everyone's life, and that you're not alone in feeling this way.

The person-centred approach to autism

Person-centred approach to autism - Emma Gosling

Emma Gosling, Senior Specialist Occupational Therapist at Options Barton, talks to Education For Everybody about the person-centred approach: an individualistic outlook for children with autism spectrum condition...

When working with an individual with Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC), it is important to start with a holistic assessment of a person’s cognitive, sensory, motor and communication needs as a first step to positive outcomes. It’s crucial that staff know what’s important to the person, their identified needs, and what’s working or not working from their perspective. This information is gathered from the individual, who is at the centre of the process, as well as the people involved in their lives. This is called a Person-Centred Approach.