National Autistic Society awards

awards

Together Trust shortlisted for two National Autistic Society awards

The Together Trust is delighted to have been shortlisted for Outstanding Health Service and Most Inspirational Social Care Professional for the National Autistic Society’s autism professional’s awards. 

The National Autistic Society awards are a significant acknowledgement of outstanding autism practice. The Trust’s Sleep Tight Trafford team have been shortlisted for the Outstanding Health Services award and residential home manager, Carmel Perry, has been shortlisted for the Most Inspirational Social Care Professional award. To get through to the final for two awards is an incredible achievement for the Sleep Tight team and Carmel, but also for the Trust as a whole.  

Politicians urged to involve children in developing mental health system

Politicians urged to involve children in developing mental health system

Politicians must include young people in decision making to try and solve the children’s mental health crisis, says Barnardo’s.

This is the message from young people supported by the charity who have had their say in a series of videos released during Children’s Mental Health Week (February 5 to 11).

The importance of early intervention is a key thread in the films, along with the call for governments to ensure teachers are adequately trained to recognise the signs a child may be having mental health issues.

The videos are timed with a survey for the UK’s largest children’s charity, which reveals half of all 12 to 16-year-olds in England feel sad or anxious at least once a week.

Active kids do better:

Active kids do better

Olympic medallist launches programme to get kids active.

Sprinter Daryll Neita unveils campaign to increase kids’ activity before, during and after school

A nationwide drive to inspire primary school children to be more active was unveiled by an Olympic medallist at a school in London today.

Sprinter Daryll Neita visited Beatrix Potter Primary School in Wandsworth to launch Active Kids Do Better – a Nike and Discovery Education programme, developed with support from Liverpool John Moores University, to help teachers increase movement and play throughout the school day.

Guide Dogs supporting children and young people

Guide Dogs supporting children and young people
As well as Family Days Out, Guide Dogs provides a range of services designed to support children, young people and their families.
Movement matters habilitation service

Guide Dogs’ movement matters service gives support to blind children and young people in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

Movement matters provides personalised training and support in mobility, orientation and independence skills, delivered by a qualified habilitation specialist.

Family support

One of the most invaluable services that Guide Dogs provide to many parents and carers of a child with vision impairment is ongoing practical and emotional support.

The Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden in Ockley - Beyond the walls of a gallery - an art trip unlike any other

Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden

The Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden in Ockley, Surrey has proudly exhibited an ever changing collection of contemporary sculpture within 10 acres of landscaped gardens for 35 years, and has played host to hundreds of schools with a range of abilities.

Imagine a living, breathing art gallery, where nature and art work in harmony to create a truly magical and unique experience. Magnificent sculptures are placed amongst mature trees and architectural plants, whilst gently moving water provides a sense of calm and an accompanying backdrop to the hundreds of wild birds, insets and mammals that call this outdoor gallery home.

Calvert Trust Exmoor

Calvert Trust Exmoor

‘Adventure sports’ and ‘disability’ probably aren’t phrases you normally put together, but at Calvert Trust Exmoor accessible and inclusive activity adventures are the norm; pupils of all ages with all types of disability take part in adventurous sports like climbing, archery, horse riding and canoeing alongside their peers.

Technology to help fight off loneliness

Companies such as Oslo-based start-up No Isolation are leading the fight in using technology to help find a solution for lonely groups of people within society. Their first product, a telepresence robot named AV1, has been designed to help a vulnerable section of society that sometimes is overlooked in the media. Children who suffer from long-term illness and cannot connect with their friends and school-mates, often suffer from depression as a result of their isolation. With doctors’ appointments and treatments sometimes taking over the lives of these children, it can be a relief to chat to their friends and learn alongside them at school using simple technology.

College pledges support for mental health campaign

Mental health

A North East college has become the first FE provider in the region to back a campaign that encourages people to speak out about mental health issues.

Time to Change is a national initiative launched by two charities, Mind and Rethink Mental Illness, to encourage debate and tackle stigmas surrounding mental health.

Now Gateshead College has become the latest organisation to lend its support to the campaign, which is being backed by more than 550 organisations across the UK.

Virtual Reality Learning

Virtual Reality

The role of virtual reality in classrooms is providing adjustments for students struggling with their mental health.

Mental health problems, such as anxiety, can inhibit someone’s ability to get to school and be physically present during lessons. Here, Sam Warnes, a former teacher and founder of EDLounge, a unique platform that gives students who struggle with mainstream education the opportunity to access learning, explains how virtual reality in classrooms can offer a solution for accommodating pupils with mental health issues.

Rein & Shine Seeks Sponsorship to Offer Free Equine-Assisted Learning to Autistic Children

Rein & Shine

A North Wiltshire equestrian centre is seeking sponsorship to be able to hold an event offering free equine-assisted learning for autistic children. Rein & Shine’s Hoof Club is running the event in support of the National Autistic Society (NAS), with the aim of benefitting the wider community on a not for profit basis.

The centre hopes to fund the event with the help of local companies with any profits being donated to the National Autistic Society.

Rein & Shine is an Accessibility Mark accredited centre, with a well-respected reputation for teaching disabled riders.