Blog

Jump Support at Jump 360, the North East’s premier trampoline park

Jump 360

Everyone is welcome to bounce at Jump 360! Jump Support is our session dedicated for individuals with additional needs or disabilities. 

 

Children and grown-ups can also enjoy giant foam pits, dodgeball courts and basketball slam-dunk lanes as well as trying their hand at a brand-new over hang rock climbing activity, which can’t be found anywhere else in the North East. Other exciting features include foam pit slides, rope ladders, log rolls and Aero Ball (think volleyball on the trampoline) as well as a designated area where Under 5s can bounce safely. This special area for mini-bouncers includes a toddler area and soft-play frame.

 

Playground equipment: why wood is superior to metal

Playground equipment

When it comes to design, the two main priorities of a playground are its focus on safety and sustainability. For children using them, they aren’t as concerned about the design of the playground, but more concerned about how fun and interactive the play area is. So, when designing a play area, it is important to consider safety, sustainability and fun. When combining these things – wooden equipment is superior to all others. 

Developing a playground

Sisterly love triumphs over anxiety

Donjeta (right) with her sister Fitore and her young niece

A young woman with learning difficulties is enjoying a happier lifestyle thanks to support from her sister and a specialist behaviour psychologist who teamed up to help her be better understood.

 

Donjeta Kaliquani, who is non-verbal, was displaying behaviour that challenges at the care service where she lives in Mitcham, Surrey, so her sister Fitore Kaliquani and behavioural expert Francesca Gerald worked closely with her and the support team at Rosebank Lodge to turn things around.

 

After about six months of dedicated efforts, Donjeta (27) is now calmer and settling down well in her new home, which is run by care provider Regard.

 

Sensory Guru gives existing customers £3000 worth of free software updates to celebrate launch of App Store

customer feedback

Sensory Guru has offered free software upgrades worth over £3000, to their entire Magic Carpet customer base, in order to show their appreciation for their clients support and enable them to have access to the latest Magic Carpet software. 

Since September 2016, Sensory Guru product specialists have visited customers to provide training and access to the new software, which will enable them to enjoy the latest Magic Carpet features and App Store – which will be launched at the beginning of May.

More than 1000 SEND school places created as plans for 131 new schools are approved

school

Almost two thousand school places for children with special educational needs and disabilities will be created as plans for a wave of new schools are approved. 

Plans for 131 new schools have been approved by the Department for Education today, creating more than 69,000 school places up and down the country. 

The majority of these schools will become free schools, which can be run by parents, community or faith groups, but plans also provide for SEND students. 

Twenty local authority areas have been approved to create a new special school through the free school process, creating a total of 1,700 school places for pupils with special educational needs and disabilities. 

National disability charity welcomes £55m childcare funding boost

Ruby Rogers and her Intervenor support worker

Sense has responded to today’s Government announcement of an additional £55m of funding towards the implementation of the 30 hours free childcare policy due to start in September. The funding, which is double the amount previously set aside by the Government, has been made available to enable nurseries, pre-schools and playgroups to invest in the new buildings and upgrade facilities needed to accommodate the new initiative. 

 

Bikers get into the easter spirit for together trust

bikers on the road

Hundreds of bikers hit the road on Sunday (9 April) to deliver Easter eggs to children and young people at the leading North West charity, the Together Trust.

Roughley’s Bikers visited the charity for their annual Easter egg drop to deliver treats to young people with behavioural problems, learning difficulties, physical disabilities and autism who are supported by the charity.

The convoy of motorbikes, trikes and scooters dressed as Easter bunnies, chickens and popular cartoon characters rode across Stockport to greet young people, staff and volunteers to drop off a generous collection of chocolate eggs.

Improving quality at Wyre Forest School

Wyre Forest School

Wyre Forest School in Kidderminster, is a special school with 250 students from early years to sixth form, and 183 members of staff. The school prides itself on working tirelessly to meet the needs of all the children so they develop and progress academically, socially, emotionally and physically. As part of this, assuring the quality teaching is essential, but with so many staff members, how are they ensuring that everyone is working towards their goals, both individually and as a school?

Here, headteacher Rebecca Garratt discusses the school’s journey towards improvement, ensuring that their pupils have the best possible education.

Planet Bounce Nottingham appoint Autism East Midlands as their chosen charity of the year 2017

Autism Awareness

In celebration of Autism Awareness Month 2017 Planet Bounce (Nottingham) have appointed Autism East Midlands as their charity of the year 2017. The popular trampoline park found in The Glasshouse, on Huntingdon Street in Nottingham city centre have set a fundraising target of £1000.00 to reach through a mix of varied fundraising and bucket collection based activities.

Back in the room

distance learning

How connectivity and collaboration are transforming distance learning

Colin Rosam, Internal Sales Manager, Healthcare, Higher Education and Further Education at IT supplier, Misco (www.misco.co.uk) writes:

The market for distance learning

Distance learning accounts for a significant proportion of the higher education sector’s revenue. Rising fees for full time on-campus degrees, changes to visa regulations and increasing adoption of online and collaborative technologies have resulted in many students opting to study remotely.  Distance learning also provides many students who are living with disabilities with a more accessible route to further education qualifications.

Pupils’ artwork to grace walls of prestigious gallery

One of the winning entries from The-Grange School's art competition for World Autism Awareness Week

Manchester Art Gallery to host World Autism Awareness Week exhibition

A school which serves Manchester’s autistic community and their families has joined forces with Manchester Art Gallery to launch an art competition culminating in an exclusive exhibition to mark World Autism Awareness Week (27 March – 2 April). 

The competition was organised by Gorton-based Grange School, and received more than 100 entries from pupils, parents and school staff across Manchester living with autism. Judges are selecting 12 winners who will have their work exhibited in the prestigious gallery.  

Inscape students hosting #BIGBLUEBAKE in celebration of world autism awareness week

Pupils baking

InCafe is hosting a Big Blue Bake to mark this year’s World Autism Awareness Week.

Pupils and staff are inviting the public to join them for afternoon tea with a difference offering guests a selection of blue cupcakes, sponges and cake pops.

The café situated inside Inscape House School, a specialist school for young people with autism spectrum condition, provides pupils with the opportunity to gain essential employability skills.

Students who work at InCafe not only learn culinary skills, but also time keeping, numeracy, problem solving, teamwork and the opportunity to interact with customers.

Headteacher Anne Price said: “Blue is recognised as the international colour to promote autism awareness.

Charity fundraising turns supporters purple

Purple Day sheep race Llwyngwain Fawr

Over a third of the 149 services across England and Wales run by private care-provider Regard are planning local fundraisers for Purple Day (Sunday 26 March) in aid of Epilepsy Action, the UK’s leading epilepsy organisation, with some of them already ahead of the action.

This year sees the ninth celebration of Purple Day, an international annual theme day aimed at dispelling the myths surrounding epilepsy and raising awareness in a positive manner.

Members of Regard’s OWL Town Farm Workshop in Sixpenny Handley, Dorset, raised nearly £70 through a variety of fun craft-based activities.

Workshop manager, Helen Ritson, said: “Lots of people tried their hand at hula hoop weaving and added some purple fabric to our still-to-be-completed community collage.

Vitamin D supplements help improve mental performance in young people

Supplements

Supplementing with vitamin D helps adolescents solve cognitively challenging tasks more easily and improves their mental well-being, according to a Norwegian study.

Young people perform better in cognitively challenging tests, have improved mental health and fewer self-reported behavioral problems when their blood levels of vitamin D are higher. Norwegian scientists demonstrated this in an intervention study of 50 male and female volunteers aged 13-14 years who received a vitamin D supplement (D3-Pearls from Pharma Nord) or a placebo. 

Don’t run away from mental health issues- just run!

John Aguilar, Principal of Padworth College

Mental health related issues in young people have been an area of concern over the last few years; in fact the issue appears to be escalating at quite an alarming rate. Over the last five years, 90% of head teachers have reported an increase in mental health problems among pupils and, over the same period, hospital admissions for self-harm have doubled for under 18s. 

Primula cheese and the NSPCC team up with children’s authors to help kids to dream big

Primula cheese and the NSPCC

Children’s authors have backed the Primula Cheese and NSPCC campaign to help kids stay safe from abuse and dream big things for their future.

Primula Cheese are 20% of the profits from their limited edition branded tubes directly to the NSPCC, which will help the charity in its work to protect young people from abuse and neglect and to help victims recover.

Peter Wanless, Chief Executive of the NSPCC, said, “Every child is born with hopes for the future but if their head is full of fear, anxiety or loneliness these thoughts can get shunted to the one side. 

The Watford school tackling children’s mental health issues with a pioneering therapy technique

​(L-R) Gemma Williamson, Nicola Furey and Lizzie Butler. Laurance Haines Primary School.

Amidst a myriad of concerns regarding the state of the UK’s mental health sector - including a serious lack of funding and huge waiting times for access to services* - one Watford primary school is leading the way inearly-intervention by championing an informed therapy technique, Drawing and Talking. 

Laurance Haines Primary & Nursery School in West Watford, first employed the therapy method in 2012, when the school’s Nurture Leader, Nicola Furey, undertook the training. She comments: “The course was recommended to me by the Nurture Group Network and it’s been central to the wellbeing of the children at Laurance Haines ever since. We do use a number of therapy methods at the school but without a shadow of doubt, Drawing and Talking is by far the most effective.”

Great Turnout for ‘Disabled Access Day’ Event at Wrea Green Equitation Centre

Disabled Access Day’ Event at Wrea Green Equitation Centre

Wrea Green Equitation Centre, based in between Blackpool and Preston, recently held a successful event to mark Disabled Access Day.

Accessibility Mark joined forces with Disabled Access Day, which aimed at encouraging more disabled people to visit new places and take up new activities such as horse riding.

The Accessibility Mark accredited centre welcomed 20 potential new clients on the day, who thoroughly enjoyed the activities organised to highlight what can be achieved by disabled riders.

Throughout the afternoon visitors were given a guided tour of the yard, where they were encouraged to pat the ponies, before watching a riding demonstration by the centre’s Accessibility Mark riders.

Speech recognition unlocks new opportunities in education for students with special education needs.

DPI software

Alistair Robbie, from Nuance Communications, explains how

Few students relish the end of their holidays and the inevitable return to school, college or university that follows. The start of a new term is an anxious time for students who have a special education needs (SEN) like dyslexia, mindful that it could often hamper their ability to share their ideas, knowledge and enthusiasm for a subject when reading or writing about it.