News

Expanding the scope of education

Children taking part in holistic education

Traditional education is traditionally recognised as the teacher-centred delivery of instruction to students. It comes with the objective of developing a mastery of core subjects like maths, reading, writing, science, and social studies. Education, as most people know it, is centred around academic learning however, another definition of education frames it as ‘an enlightening experience’. This broader understanding of education carries a lot of value for students as it embraces an interconnected mindset that reflects the environment in which they exist.

Careers scheme helping disabled pupils get digital jobs

Careers scheme helping disabled pupils get digital jobs

Eight schools in Manchester are taking part in a new employability programme that will help teenagers aged 16-18 with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) to get digital jobs.

‘Digital Inc.’ will provide each school with 10 days of employer-led support, with experts from local digital companies coming in to classrooms to take students through a business start-up process and talk about how they themselves got a job in the creative digital sector.

Abbot’s Lea School appoints four new members of staff

Abbot’s Lea School appoints four new members of staff

Abbot’s Lea School in Woolton has welcomed four new members to its team, including one former student. 

The school specialises in highest quality holistic education for young people with Autism and associated complex learning and social needs. It currently employs some 120 staff and is striving to be an International Centre of Excellence in Autism Education, Research and Professional Development.

Joining the strategic leadership team is Micah Grimshaw. A fully qualified and experienced special education teacher, she takes on a role of the head of autism research and development, being responsible for creating, implementing and promoting the school’s autism research and development strategy.

Stockport Schools Tackle Health and Wellbeing in Video Competition

Stockport School Students taking Part In Competition

Totally Local Company has launched a new competition to promote the key messages of healthy living and wellbeing to primary school children in Stockport.

Working in partnership with Life Leisure, Totally Local Company will invite pupils from schools they work with to create a short video promoting healthy living and wellbeing.

To encourage collaborative learning and thinking, Totally Local Company are asking children to work in their classes and share their thoughts and ideas on this subject and create a video with a winning message. The video can take any form they wish, such as a song/pop video, dance, poem, play or chat show as long as it addresses and promotes healthy living and wellbeing.

Shropshire-based Hillcrest Shifnal School extends specialist provision to Key Stage 1 pupils in response to demand for early intervention

Hillcrest student

Hillcrest Shifnal School, an independent specialist setting in Shropshire for children with social, emotional and mental health (SEMH) needs, is thrilled to have been granted permission from the Department for Education to extend its provision to support Key Stage 1 (KS1) students from the age of five - previously it catered for students aged 7-19. The new extension reflects a growing demand for early intervention, which has been shown to help students with SEMH needs to realise their potential and significantly increase their chances of re-accessing mainstream education. 

Yorkshire education technology start-up a winner at social enterprise awards

Yorkshire education technology start-up a winner at social enterprise awards

An education technology company using software to create stage-appropriate lesson plans to help improve levels of physical literacy among primary school children has been named winner of the 'Tech for Good' category at the 2019 Social Enterprise Yorkshire and the Humber (SEYH) Awards.

Sporting Age, based at the John Smith’s Stadium in Huddersfield, was named winner at the 2019 Social Enterprise Yorkshire and the Humber (SEYH) Awards.

The Tech for Good award recognises technological innovation which creates social impact, and how the creative use of software has benefited the community in which it is used.

Great Ormond Street Ambassador Launches New Play Therapy Service

Sad little girl at Play Therapy Service

Play therapist and Great Ormond Street ambassador Amanda Seyderhelm is launching a specialist play therapy service which will address the increasing needs of children struggling with issues related to loss and change. Based in the Lincolnshire town of Stamford, Amanda will focus on the requirements of children aged between seven and 10.

Primary school children almost as stressed over exams as GCSE pupils

Primary school children in classroom

A third of primary school parents say exams are making their children stressed, according to a new study looking into the pressure pupils are put under during their school years.

New research by home education provider Oxford Home Schooling reveals that even primary school children are being strained by the prospect of their academic performance.

The study reveals that, alongside a third (33%) of parents saying their child feels stressed by exams, two in five parents (40%) of pupils aged between five and 11 feel there is too much pressure on their children to perform well in them.

Do children get too much homework?

Children doing homework

More than one in ten primary school children are spending over five hours on homework each week, according to a study looking into the pressure pupils are put under during their school years.

Research by home education provider Oxford Home Schooling reveals that even primary school children are being strained by the prospect of their academic performance.

The study reveals that, alongside a third (33%) of parents saying their child feels stressed by exams, two in five parents (40%) of pupils aged between five and 11 feel there is too much pressure on their children to perform well in them.

Imagine a time when EdTech can deliver better outcomes, free up time for teachers to teach and more intuitively protect pupils. It is not so far away

Imagine a time when EdTech can deliver better outcomes, free up time for teachers to teach and more intuitively protect pupils. It is not so far away
by Jeremy Cooper, Managing Director, RM Education

In August 2018, Damian Hinds challenged the tech industry to “launch an education revolution for schools, colleges and universities”[1]. I was delighted to join one of the leading EdTech businesses in this country – RM Education – earlier this month, and it is my goal to do just that – or at least to align the revolution that has already started with the challenges that educational leaders are facing today.

EdTech is evolving fast for good reasons – that technology really can make teachers’ lives easier, it can help schools operate more efficiently, and above all, it can enable better and safer educational experiences and outcomes for pupils.  

Achievement for All Global 200 Million Minutes Reading Challenge! 

Children taking part in the 200 Million Minutes Reading Challenge! 

On Thursday 7th March 2019 (World Book Day), Achievement for All will be launching their biggest challenge yet as they bring children and young people across the world together to collectively attempt to read for 200 Million Minutes!!

Following the huge success of the charity’s 100 Million Minutes Reading Challenge in March 2018, which saw more than 420,000 children and young people collectively read for 100,019,560 minutes, Achievement for All is doubling the target to 200 Million Minutes. For the first time the challenge is open to schools, settings, families, libraries, community groups, businesses and organisations from across the world to help achieve this never before-reached target! 

BIEA International STEM Youth Innovation Competition officially open

BIEA International STEM Youth Innovation Competition

On January 15, 2019, the 2nd annual International STEM Youth Innovation Competition was officially opened at a ceremony at London’s prestigious Royal Institution (RI). The British International Education Association (BIEA) alongside its partner, the Born Free Foundation (BFF) announced the competition before an audience made up of educators, STEM professionals, members of industry and invited dignitaries. Working with the support of the British Science Association (BSA), the Royal Institution (RI), Engineering UK and the Royal Airforce Museum (RAF Museum), BIEA called out for students around the world to get involved and sign up to take part.

Education that’s truly special

Education that’s truly special

When you visit the stunning, eco-friendly, 40 acre campus on the Dorset/Hampshire border it becomes apparent why this college is a first choice for parents and young adults with special educational needs.

Individual buildings linked by natural pathways through green open spaces and woodland give a sense of calm and wellbeing. Exclusive onsite facilities include a gym hall, heated indoor swimming pool, kitchen garden and purpose-built therapy building offering onsite specialist input from occupational, physiotherapy as well as complementary therapies such as massage, music and art.

Budding engineers from Bradfield School reach national finals of F1 competition

Bradfield School reach national finals of F1 competition

A group of six Year 10 students from Bradfield School, Sheffield, are to take part in the national finals of the engineering competition ‘F1 in Schools’ after placing 3rd in the Yorkshire and Humber regional final last month.

Having received sponsorship in the form of funding, technical assistance and components from a number of organisations, including UK Steel Enterprise (UKSE), Timkem, WNT and Primetals Technologies, team ‘Sheff1 Racing’ designed and manufactured a miniature compressed air powered car to take part in the event.

Cuts to specialist teachers threaten deaf children’s futures in the East Midlands

Cuts to specialist teachers threaten deaf children’s futures in the East Midlands

Teachers of the Deaf, who provide vital help and support to deaf children throughout their education, have been reduced by 7% in the last year, a new report from the Consortium for Research into Deaf Education reveals. 

The figures also show that almost one in three (29%) have now been cut since the annual report began eight years ago.

In the 2010/11 academic year, there were 88 fully-qualified specialist teachers for the region’s deaf children. This had fallen to 67 by 2016/17 and the total now stands at just 62.

The National Deaf Children’s Society, which is part of the group that produces the report, says specialist teachers have a huge impact on the lives of deaf children, starting at diagnosis and lasting throughout their education. 

Help Children Spot Fake News

Fake News in newspaper

New films and resources to help primary school children spot fake news and build digital literacy skills are being launched at London’s Bett Show this week.

Building upon Discovery Education’s popular Espresso News content, these new resources feature contributions from ITN journalists and the Institute for Strategic Dialogue. Special lesson plans and videos will help children to develop a critical eye for the news and social media stories they consume. They will also give pupils an insight into the world of news production, as they hear from ITN’s Charlene White about how journalists fact-check and why it’s important to question where stories come from. 

Industry body calls for in-depth consultation on Disabled Students' Allowances 

Disabled Student

The British Assistive Technology Association (BATA) welcomes the Department for Education’s continued commitment to support disabled and neurodiverse students in higher education through the provision of Disabled Student Allowances (DSA).

However, the plans to tender the provision of assistive technology equipment and training, have led to uncertainty about the future of DSA and the wider industry that supports disabled students.

The sector body is calling on government to ensure there is thorough consultation with industry stakeholders, higher education providers and students.

TokensFor Wins Backing from Teaching Professionals for Plastic Token Reward System

Based in Sheffield UK, TokensFor Limited, a leading plastic token manufacturer for schools, wins backing from educational and teaching professionals for their year on year support in schools.

TokensFor has revolutionised the plastic token industry, especially within the education sector. The plastic token supplier provides a behavioural support network and reward system for children in schools who are on the autistic spectrum. But it’s not just the children who receive the benefits; it’s the teachers too.

Teachers can experience mental health issues due to poor behaviour within the classroom. Noticeable psychological impacts include lost teaching time, decrease in teacher job satisfaction, poor teacher recruitment and retention, and stress and mental health.